Preston. A Visit To The Moon.

I’ve recently paid a visit to the moon, I know that sounds a bit extreme so let me explain.

PRESTON. Herris Museum.

Museum of The Moon.

 

My lunar trip took place thanks to excellent Harris Museum in Preston, Lancashire. Until the 24th of February the museum is hosting the stunning art instillation ‘The Museum Of The Moon’ created by the artist Luke Jerram, it’s also accompanied by a soundtrack from the composer Dan Jones.

03-02-19 HARRIS MUSEUM . Museum Of The Moon D

The artwork is a 23 feet high model of the Moon created from NASA survey photographs and is on tour to various locations around the world, both indoors and out. At the it’s suspended in the atrium which runs through the centre of the building which stands on the town’s Market Square and dates form the 1890’s. As well as containing an absorbing collection of items and artworks, as well as the city’s library, the building also hosts touring exhibitions.

03-02-19 HARRIS MUSEUM . Museum Of The Moon C

PRESTON. Herris Museum.

Harris Museum. Museum of the Moon.

If you are in the area and want to meet the Moon close up you have until the 24th February, or you can track it as it travels around.

 

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Chorley. Snowdrops In Astley Park.

The Seasons are turning warm, the days are getting slowly longer and the sun is becoming less shy about being seen out and about. Today started a bit on the grim side with a slow fog lazing about but by the mid morning it had largely burnt away so I decided to make a break for it before the weather closed in again.

I decided to head for the market town of Chorley, about an hour’s drive away, sometimes less if the traffic is behaving itself. When I drive to Chorley I generally leave the car in Astley Park, it’s just off the town centre and it makes for a pleasant walk. The main path is straight and clear from the front of the house, see the headline shot, but there are also paths that wander through the woodlands, over bridges and past burbling streams. These would have been used as an elegant diversion for the occupants of the house through the years.

As is the way with these things, ownership of the house passed through different families, either by marriage or a family line dying out. The Charnocks, Brookes and Townley-Parkers all owned the house at one time, eventually it passed into the care of the council in the 1920’s It’s open now at weekends and contains a fantastically impressive plasterwork ceiling as well as a gallery and exhibition space.

The impressive frontage with it’s lion capped doorway dates from the 1660’s, being built onto the original timber frames house. Alas it was a bit of a rushed job and became slightly detached, the floor of the long gallery now has an impressive set of bumps and hollows as you promenade along it. I’ve also heard that it may be haunted….

On a lighter note the old stable block has a really good cafe.

14/02/19  CHORLEY. Astley Hall Snowdrops.

CHORLEY. Snowdrops in Astley Park.

One treat of today is that the snowdrops, Galanthus Nivalis, as my late father’s gardening books tell me are now out in profusion and they added that striking burst of white whenever the sun broke through the clouds that were cartwheeling across the sky. A pleasant bonus on a crisp day, I might try and catch them again before they fade.

14/02/19  CHORLEY. Astley Hall Snowdrops.

CHORLEY. Snowdrops in Astley Park.

14/02/19  CHORLEY. Astley Hall Snowdrops.

CHORLEY. Snowdrops in Astley Park.

14/02/19  CHORLEY. Astley Hall Snowdrops.

CHORLEY. Snowdrops in Astley Park.

14/02/19  CHORLEY. Astley Park. The Hall. Walled Garden.

CHORLEY. Astley Hall in Astley Park. The Walled garden and recentley restored greenhouse.

 

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RIVINGTON. Sunlight And Old Stones.

High on the sometimes bleak West Pennine Moors in between the Lancashire towns of Horwich and Chorley there’s a hilltop rich in trees, with here and there the remains of buildings showing through. These are the Terraced Gardens, the creation of local businessman William Lever, later 1st Viscount Leverhulme. I’ve been visiting the gardens since my childhood and have seen the ebb and flow of their condition over time. The gardens were an extravagant mix of pathways and follies, the designer was Thomas Mawson. From the top of the gardens there are views right across the plain of Lancashire to the coast.

Leverhulme created the gardens at the turn of the 1900’s, he was familiar with the area from his courting days and the gardens were heavily influenced by his travels. He made his fortune by building on his family’s grocery business, creating the very successful Sunlight Soap brand along the way. His main home was on the Wirral at Thornton Hough, the Wirral is also the location of the garden village of Port Sunlight which he built to house the workers from the adjacent factory. The fascinating Lady Lever Galley which houses some of the art collection built up by him and his wife and opened in her memory can also be found in Port Sunlight.

After Lord Leverhulme’s death in 1925 the estate was sold on to the owner of a local brewery and on his death the estate was bought by Liverpool Corporation who already owned much of the land in the area and had created a series of reservoirs to supply the city. The main house and the estates’ gatehouses were demolished in 1947 and the long period of decline began. Now in the hands of the water company United Utilities a program consolidation and restoration work is underway.

11/11/18 RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS.  Seven Arch Bridge.

RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. The Seven Arch Bridge across the old road from Chorley into Horwich.

11/11/18 RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS.  Seven Arch Bridge Steps.

RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. The steps leading down from the summer house to the Seven Arch Bridge over the old Chorley – Horwich road. Due to the steep slopes visible in this shot the gardens were laid out in a series of terraces.

11/11/18 RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. The Pigeon Tower.

RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. One of the most striking and visible features of the gardens is The Pigeon Tower seen from the boating pool. The tower was built to take advatage of the views from the highest point of the gardens. The top floor was used as a sitting & sewing room by Lady Leverhulme. as can be seen from the photo consolidation and restoration is work taking place throughout the gardens.

11/11/18 RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. The Swimming Pool Restorati

RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. The the boating pool beneath the Pigeon Tower undergoing restoration. Viscount Leverhulme being a great believer in the benefits of fresh air and exercise would occaisionally swim in the pool. Again the restoration work in progress can been seen with the new lining to the pool and the clearing away of overgrown vegetation.

11/11/18 RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS.  Bungalow Ruins.

RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. Lord Leverhulme’s house at Rivington was a bungalow by the name of Roynton Cottage. This tiled flooring is all that now remains of the building. Roynton Cottage replaced an earlier, wooden cottage which was burnt down in 1913 by Edith Rigby as a Sufferagette protest. The curve of the tiles runs along the edge of what had been the cicular ballroom, the ceiling of which was dark blue and decorated with gold stars representing the constellations on the night of Lord Leverhulme’s birth, 19th September, 1851.

11/11/18 RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS.  Ruined Shelter.

RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. The ruins of a garden shelter on the level below the site of the bungalow.

11/11/18 RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS.  Double Staircase.

RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. the double staircase which leads up from the boating pool to the site of the bungalow Roynton Cottage.

11/11/18 RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. Gardeners Cottages.

RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. Gardeners Cottages above the Japanese Pool.

11/11/18 RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS.  The Dell & Blue Pool Bridg

RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. Looking down the course of the waterfalls in the dell towards the footbridge.

11/11/18 RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS.  Caves Above The Dell.

RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. The man made caves alos known as The Bear Caves, on the path above the Dell.

11/11/18 RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. The Japanese Pool.

RIVINGTON TERRACED GARDENS. The Japanese Pool. Inspired by the Willow Pattern design in its heyday the pool as surrounded with tea houses lit by lanterns and was fed by waterfalls and cascades from the upper levels of the gardens.

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SHEFFIELD. Night In The City.

The clocks are changing back and the year is helter skelter-ing its way to an end. Before the days get too short to travel far I took a train trip over the Pennines to Sheffield. It’s a city built on hills with a history built on the steel industry, parts of which still survive today though modern industries are playing a larger and larger part in the local economy.

Though some of the heritage architecture is going there are still fascinating pockets of interest dotted around and about. One of my reasons for this trip was to try out the new tram train which now links Sheffield with nearby Rotherham, its an extension of the city’s existing tram network and is a combination of light rail and a repurposed heavy rail route. One of those good ideas that everybody says in the way forward but then disappears into the swamp of focus groups and consultations etc. Well its up and running now, for a period of evaluation. Go figure. It works, try it, it’s good.

I was making my way back to Sheffield’s railway station when I took these shots. It was a Saturday and in that ghost period between the shoppers having gone home and the party animals not yet arrived for a night out.

Enough words, bring on the pictures.

03/11/18  SHEFFIELD. The Peace Gardens. The Fountains.

SHEFFIELD. The Fountains in the Peace Gardens on Pinstone Street by the Town Hall.

03/11/18  SHEFFIELD. Tudor Square.

SHEFFIELD. Tudor Square with the Crucuble Theatre and The Lyceum Theatre.

03/11/18  SHEFFIELD The Globe Howard Street.

SHEFFIELD. A beacon in the gathering dark on Howard Street stands the Globe Pub, an easy walk down the hill to the railway station and on the edge of the student quarter.

03/11/18  SHEFFIELD. Arundel Gate.

SHEFFIELD. A bus speeds the Saturday shoppers home to their warm firesides as the evening closes in.

03/11/18  SHEFFIELD Sheaf Square.

SHEFFIELD. A silver water featrure wall, made of the steel that gave Sheffield its fame, leads down Sheaf square to the railway station.

03/11/18  SHEFFIELD Sheaf Square. The Railway Station.

SHEFFIELD. Sheaf Square, blazing with lights, the railway station welcomes the weary traveller on a cold night.

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Chester. A City And It’s Walls.

Fancying a few hours out and about in the cool October air I took the train out to Chester. I have a choice of rail routes to the city and this time I took the longer one through Liverpool and down the Wirral Peninsular. I like to use rail journeys to make notes and work on ideas for blog posts, books and other photo projects.

I arrived in Chester just before lunchtime and decided to to the market for a bite to eat, I’d seen a bakery stall there on a previous visit and thought I would give it a try. Yes it was good, very good in fact, it’s now on my list of places to eat and drink. I like having these bolt holes, oases where I can sit back and watch the world go by.

As you will see from the photos, the weather was not the most inspiring or welcoming but it was good enough to have a walk around and see what was going on in Chester.

17/10/18.  CHESTER. Northgate Street.

CHESTER. Northgate Sttreet opens out to form a square in front of the Town Hall and across from that sits the Cathedral of St. Werburgh.

17/10/18.  CHESTER. The Groves.

CHESTER. The Groves is the pleasantly tree lined promenade down by Chester’s river, the Dee. Busy with visitors on a crisp cool day as the leaves take on their autumn colours.

17/10/18.  CHESTER. Morgan's Mount.

CHESTER. Morgans Mount on the city walls. The cannon sculpture commemorating the civil war. In 1645 King Charles Ist watched the defeat of his forces at the Battle of Rownton Moor from a tower on the Walls of Chester. The cannon sculpture was created by Colin Spofforth.

17/10/18.  CHESTER. The Market. Crustem Bakery.

CHESTER. Crustem Bakery and Cafe on the market.

17/10/18.  CHESTER. The Market. Crustem Bakery.

CHESTER. Crustem Bakery and Cafe on the market. My chicken, bacon & salad sandwich. I had seen this bakery on a previous visit to Chester but I had already eaten and anyway the place was quite busy but I made a note of it for future reference. I was not disappointed and I shall be returning.

17/10/18.  CHESTER. The Market. Crustem Bakery.

CHESTER. Crustem Bakery and Cafe on the market.

17/10/18.  CHESTER. The Water Tower.

CHESTER. Now garlanded with trees, the Water Tower once stood with the waters of the River Dee lapping against it’s base as it guarded the entrance to Chester’s harbour on the river.The silting of the Dee as it’s course changed led to the closing of the harbour and the city loosing it’s pre-eminence as a trading port to Liverpool on the River Mersey and left the Water Tower standing on dry land.

17/10/18.  CHESTER. Watergate Street Centurion.

CHESTER. On the corner of Bridge Street & Watergate Street a local Centurion goes about his duties. You encounter these costumed guides quite regularly around the city, often in charge of parties of schoolchildren enjoying the experience of being drilled and marching as the Roman Army.

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Chorley. Chorley Live, Music On The Streets.

Can I make a suggestion for your diaries next year? Clear a space around the beginning of October and make a note to get along to Chorley Live. Its a marvellous music event that takes over the town centre, places not normally thought of as venues become the stage for a two night celebration of live music of all types.

Professional, semi professional and people chancing their luck at an open mike session all make the two evenings swing along. You won’t go hungry either there’s food as well as an interesting selection of beers from the bars and pubs around the town centre.

Enough with the words, on with the pictures.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE.  Bees Country Kitchen.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. Part of the fun of Chorley Live is the wide variety of food available. Bee’s Country Kitchen on the covered market, offer a wide selection of home cooked food.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE.  The Covered market. Donna James.

CHORLEY LIVE ‘!8. Donna James gives and open air performance on a cool evening at the Covered Market.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE.  The Covered Market.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. With is central location the Covered Market is a natural hub for Chorley Live.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE.  Face Painting On Cleveland Street.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. As well as enjoying the music. atmosphere and food, you can also indulge in a bit of face painting.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE.  Adam Heap.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. Adam Heap brings his own take on the songs of George Ezra for the patrons of the Ginnel Bar.

05/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE '18. Sherpards Hall Ale House. Yoz Hindley

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. Yoz Hindley and guitar make the most of the Ale House’s intimate atmpsphere.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE. Jan et Al.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. Entertaining the audience in the Market Hub Centre Jan et Al add a Parisian twist to the evening.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE.  The White Bull.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. The White Bull on Market Street, one of the Chorley Live venues.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE.  Fazakerley Street Doughnuts.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. Live music, beer, and doughnuts on Fazakerly Street. All part of the Chorley Live experience.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE.  Lone Violinist On Chapel Street.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. A lone violinist serenades the night in the gathering shadows on Chapel Street.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE.  The Covered Market.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. A wide selection of food is part of the Chorley Live experience here at the Covered Market.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE.  Lone Violinist On Chapel Street.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. A lone violinist serenades the night in the gathering shadows on Chapel Street.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE. Mike Kneafsey At The White Bull.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. Mike Kneafsey strums the night away at the White Bull.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE.  The Shed Bar.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. As well as being a warm and intimate venue, the Shed Bar serves an excellent selection of beers.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE. The Shepheards Hall  Ale House.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. The Shepheard’s Hall Ale House, is a cosy bar that is another of the Chorley Live venues. Real ale and great music.

06/10/18 CHORLEY LIVE.  The Covered Market.

CHORLEY LIVE ’18. A wide selection of food is part of the Chorley Live experience here at the Covered Market.

So there you are, don’t say I didn’t tell you about it, might see you there next year.

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Chorley. Waiting For The Bus.

Even though I’m a car owner I still like to use public transport regularly, either the bus or the train. I welcome the change from being the driver so I can just sit back and let the journey unfold. I find these sorts of journeys really helpful if I’m working on a project, a photo book, a short story or a blog post that’s got a bit ‘sticky’ or isn’t progressing as well as it should. I just sit and watch the world go by the bus or train window and let my mind freewheel. I try not to deliberately think about the problem in hand, that just seems to chase any solution further away into the dark corners.

There’s plenty of stimulus to be found on these journeys, scraps of overheard conversation, or scenes being acted out as you pass by.

What were those two staring at so intently?

What was in the big, cardboard box that was so heavy?

The briefly noticed scene in a cafe window, do those two people meet regularly?

The list is endless.

There was a particular reason for me travelling to Chorley, a market town in central Lancashire, not too far from where I live. The town has a vibrant centre and market, with plenty of independent traders and they always put on a good event. I was going to collect my ticket to the flower show which is held at the end of July in the grounds of Astley Hall which is just off the town centre. This is the fourth year that the show is being held and each year they have added to and improved it.

It has become a permanent fixture now in my own calendar. There’s all the attractions you would expect, the displays, the talks, appearances from well known gardeners from the TV. There’s also a growing food court area.

Speaking of food, collecting my ticket only took a few minutes so I had plenty of time to have a walk around the town and the market. I had a really good brunch at one of my favourites, Bee’s Country Kitchen on the market and after some more shopping I headed back to the bus station in time to have an afternoon coffee & cake at Woodchats Cafe on the bus station, in fact you can just make it out at the top, right hand corner of the photo.

The next event I’m looking forward to after the flower show is Chorley Live, a two night event of live music played at venues throughout the town centre. I blog more about that one when I’ve been.

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